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seattle unfinished wood furniture

Seattle Unfinished Wood Furniture – XL-Twin Size Charleston Platform Bed Frame – Solid Hardwood – Disney Hall

Seattle Unfinished Wood Furniture

    unfinished wood
  • Wood that has not yet been touched by paint or stain.
    furniture
  • furnishings that make a room or other area ready for occupancy; "they had too much furniture for the small apartment"; "there was only one piece of furniture in the room"
  • Furniture (probably from the French 'fournir' — to provide) is the mass noun for the movable objects ('mobile' in Latin languages) intended to support various human activities such as seating and sleeping in beds, to hold objects at a convenient height for work using horizontal surfaces above
  • Furniture was a British pop band, active from 1979 to 1991 and best known for their 1986 Top 30 hit "Brilliant Mind".
  • In typesetting, furniture is a term for pieces of wood that are shorter than the height of the type. These pieces are used to layout type by blocking out empty spaces (white space) in a layout set in a chase.
    seattle
  • a major port of entry and the largest city in Washington; located in west central Washington on the protected waters of Puget Sound with the snow-capped peaks of the Cascade Range and Mount Ranier visible to the south and east; an aerospace and computer center; site of the University of Washington
  • Seattle (, ) is the northernmost major city on the West Coast of the United States. A seaport situated on an isthmus between Puget Sound (an arm of the Pacific Ocean) and Lake Washington, about south of the Canada – United States border, it is named after Chief Seattle, of the Duwamish and
  • "Seattle" is a song written by Hugo Montenegro, Jack Keller and Ernie Sheldon. It was used as the theme for the 1968-70 ABC-TV U.S. television show Here Come the Brides. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seattle_(song)
  • Seattle is a single by The Brighton Port Authority. Contains vocal by Emmy the Great.

seattle unfinished wood furniture – XL-Twin Size
XL-Twin Size Charleston Platform Bed Frame – Solid Hardwood
XL-Twin Size Charleston Platform Bed Frame - Solid Hardwood
Our Charleston Platform Bed frame is made of solid unfinished poplar hardwood. The wood has been kiln dried and planed on 4 sides to be smooth to the touch. The wood takes stain or paint exceptionally well but most of our customers elect to leave it as is and enjoy the beauty of natural wood. Matching wood headboard included. Optional under bed storage drawers are available.

82% (>17)

Disney Hall
Disney Hall
Frank Gehry
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search
Frank Owen Gehry
CC LLD (hc) PhD (hc) DEng (hc) DArch (hc) DA (CIA, hc) DA (RISD, hc) DA (OAI, hc)

Personal information
Name Frank Owen Gehry
CC LLD (hc) PhD (hc) DEng (hc) DArch (hc) DA (CIA, hc) DA (RISD, hc) DA (OAI, hc)
Nationality Canadian, American
Birth date February 28, 1929 (1929-02-28) (age 81)
Birth place Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Work
Practice Gehry Partners, LLP
Buildings Guggenheim Museum, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Gehry Residence, Weisman Art Museum, Dancing House, Art Gallery of Ontario
Awards AIA Gold Medal
National Medal of Arts
Order of Canada
Pritzker Prize

Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg; February 28, 1929) is a Canadian-American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.

His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions. Many museums, companies, and cities seek Gehry’s services as a badge of distinction, beyond the product he delivers.

His best-known works include the titanium-covered Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spanish Basque Country, Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles, Experience Music Project in Seattle, Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis, Dancing House in Prague, Czech Republic and the MARTa Museum in Herford, Germany. However, it was his private residence in Santa Monica, California, which jump-started his career, lifting it from the status of "paper architecture," a phenomenon that many famous architects have experienced in their formative decades through experimentation almost exclusively on paper before receiving their first major commission in later years.

Contents [hide]
1 Personal life
2 Architectural style
3 Criticism
4 Other notable aspects of career
4.1 Awards
4.2 Academia
4.3 Budgets
4.4 Celebrity status
4.5 Documentary
4.6 Fish and furniture
5 Software development
6 Works
7 Awards
8 Honorary doctorates
9 See also
10 References
10.1 Notes
10.2 Bibliography
11 External links

[edit] Personal life
Frank Owen Gehry was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; his parents were Polish Jews[1]. A creative child, he was encouraged by his grandmother, Caplan, with whom he would build little cities out of scraps of wood.[2] His use of corrugated steel, chain link fencing, and other materials was partly inspired by spending Saturday mornings at his grandfather’s hardware store. He would spend time drawing with his father and his mother introduced him to the world of art. "So the creative genes were there," Gehry says. "But my father thought I was a dreamer, I wasn’t gonna amount to anything. It was my mother who thought I was just reticent to do things. She would push me."[3]

In 1947 Gehry moved to California, got a job driving a delivery truck, and studied at Los Angeles City College, eventually to graduate from the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture. After graduation from USC in 1954, he spent time away from the field of architecture in numerous other jobs, including service in the United States Army. He studied city planning at the Harvard Graduate School of Design for a year, leaving before completing the program. In 1952, still known as Frank Goldberg, he married Anita Snyder, who he claims was the one who told him to change his name, which he did, to Frank Gehry. In 1966 he and Snyder divorced. In 1975 he married Berta Isabel Aguilera, his current wife. He has two daughters from his first marriage, and two sons from his second marriage.

Having grown up in Canada, Gehry is a huge fan of hockey. He began a hockey league in his office, FOG (which stands for Frank Owen Gehry), though he no longer plays with them.[citation needed] In 2004, he designed the trophy for the World Cup of Hockey.[citation needed] Gehry holds dual citizenship in the United States and Canada. He lives in Santa Monica, California, and continues to practice out of Los Angeles.

[edit] Architectural style

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, SpainMuch of Gehry’s work falls within the style of Deconstructivism. Deconstructivism, also known as DeCon Architecture, is often referred to as post-structuralist in nature for its ability to go beyond current modalities of structural definition. In architecture, its application tends to depart from modernism in its inherent criticism of culturally inherited givens such as societal goals and functional necessity. Because of this, unlike early modernist structures, DeCon structures are not required to reflect specific social or universal ideas, such as speed or universality of form, and they do not reflect a belief that form follows function. Gehry’s own Santa Monica residence is a commonly cited example of deconstructivist architecture, as it was so drastically divorced from its original context, and, in such a manner, as to subvert its original spatial intention.

Gehry is sometimes associated with what is known as the "Los Angeles Schoo

Disney Hall
Disney Hall
Frank Gehry
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to: navigation, search
Frank Owen Gehry
CC LLD (hc) PhD (hc) DEng (hc) DArch (hc) DA (CIA, hc) DA (RISD, hc) DA (OAI, hc)

Personal information
Name Frank Owen Gehry
CC LLD (hc) PhD (hc) DEng (hc) DArch (hc) DA (CIA, hc) DA (RISD, hc) DA (OAI, hc)
Nationality Canadian, American
Birth date February 28, 1929 (1929-02-28) (age 81)
Birth place Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Work
Practice Gehry Partners, LLP
Buildings Guggenheim Museum, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Gehry Residence, Weisman Art Museum, Dancing House, Art Gallery of Ontario
Awards AIA Gold Medal
National Medal of Arts
Order of Canada
Pritzker Prize

Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg; February 28, 1929) is a Canadian-American Pritzker Prize-winning architect based in Los Angeles, California.

His buildings, including his private residence, have become tourist attractions. Many museums, companies, and cities seek Gehry’s services as a badge of distinction, beyond the product he delivers.

His best-known works include the titanium-covered Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spanish Basque Country, Walt Disney Concert Hall in downtown Los Angeles, Experience Music Project in Seattle, Weisman Art Museum in Minneapolis, Dancing House in Prague, Czech Republic and the MARTa Museum in Herford, Germany. However, it was his private residence in Santa Monica, California, which jump-started his career, lifting it from the status of "paper architecture," a phenomenon that many famous architects have experienced in their formative decades through experimentation almost exclusively on paper before receiving their first major commission in later years.

Contents [hide]
1 Personal life
2 Architectural style
3 Criticism
4 Other notable aspects of career
4.1 Awards
4.2 Academia
4.3 Budgets
4.4 Celebrity status
4.5 Documentary
4.6 Fish and furniture
5 Software development
6 Works
7 Awards
8 Honorary doctorates
9 See also
10 References
10.1 Notes
10.2 Bibliography
11 External links

Personal life
Frank Owen Gehry was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada; his parents were Polish Jews[1]. A creative child, he was encouraged by his grandmother, Caplan, with whom he would build little cities out of scraps of wood.[2] His use of corrugated steel, chain link fencing, and other materials was partly inspired by spending Saturday mornings at his grandfather’s hardware store. He would spend time drawing with his father and his mother introduced him to the world of art. "So the creative genes were there," Gehry says. "But my father thought I was a dreamer, I wasn’t gonna amount to anything. It was my mother who thought I was just reticent to do things. She would push me."[3]

In 1947 Gehry moved to California, got a job driving a delivery truck, and studied at Los Angeles City College, eventually to graduate from the University of Southern California’s School of Architecture. After graduation from USC in 1954, he spent time away from the field of architecture in numerous other jobs, including service in the United States Army. He studied city planning at the Harvard Graduate School of Design for a year, leaving before completing the program. In 1952, still known as Frank Goldberg, he married Anita Snyder, who he claims was the one who told him to change his name, which he did, to Frank Gehry. In 1966 he and Snyder divorced. In 1975 he married Berta Isabel Aguilera, his current wife. He has two daughters from his first marriage, and two sons from his second marriage.

Having grown up in Canada, Gehry is a huge fan of hockey. He began a hockey league in his office, FOG (which stands for Frank Owen Gehry), though he no longer plays with them.[citation needed] In 2004, he designed the trophy for the World Cup of Hockey.[citation needed] Gehry holds dual citizenship in the United States and Canada. He lives in Santa Monica, California, and continues to practice out of Los Angeles.

] Architectural style

The Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, SpainMuch of Gehry’s work falls within the style of Deconstructivism. Deconstructivism, also known as DeCon Architecture, is often referred to as post-structuralist in nature for its ability to go beyond current modalities of structural definition. In architecture, its application tends to depart from modernism in its inherent criticism of culturally inherited givens such as societal goals and functional necessity. Because of this, unlike early modernist structures, DeCon structures are not required to reflect specific social or universal ideas, such as speed or universality of form, and they do not reflect a belief that form follows function. Gehry’s own Santa Monica residence is a commonly cited example of deconstructivist architecture, as it was so drastically divorced from its original context, and, in such a manner, as to subvert its original spatial intention.

Gehry is sometimes associated with what is known as the "Los Angeles School,"

seattle unfinished wood furniture
Winsome Wood Kingston Removable Tray Wine Storage Cube
Winsome Wood’s new Kingston Collection for wine storage is designed to coordinate with other pieces in the line, stand alone as a single unit or stack to increase storage capacity. This traditional style holds 20 750ml bottles or a tier can be removed to